Viagra originally developed for

Posted: 007h-ck On: 16-Feb-2019
<b>Viagra</b> Performs Not Only in Bed, But in the Heart - NBC News

Viagra Performs Not Only in Bed, But in the Heart - NBC News

The real story behind America’s most-prescribed treatment for erectile dysfunction is anything but sexy. The potent passion pill was originally designed to ease physical troubles of a different kind, not to do the lusty job it gives millions of men a lift with now. It all started in 1985, when Pfizer chemists Albert Wood (yes, that's his real last name) and Peter Dunn developed a drug called sildenafil citrate. They thought it would be helpful in lowering high blood pressure and treating angina. The researchers knew they were on to something huge. Little did they know they had their hands on the beginnings of what would eventually become the world’s first oral elixir for impotence -- Pfizer’s little blue thrill pill. They’d concocted some seriously powerful stuff, strong enough to give aging men their mojo back, typically within 30 to 60 minutes of taking the pill. Sensing a revolutionary hit, Pfizer immediately scrapped testing Viagra as a heart medication and pursued it hard and fast as a remedy for erectile dysfunction. By 1993, tests to see if Viagra could be used to treat erectile dysfunction began. They included some 3,000 patients, ages 19 to 87 years old. Some of the best inventions and discoveries in the history of civilization have been accidental. Penicillin, Teflon, radioactivity, even your favourite Coca-Cola were all chance discoveries. An accidental invention is one where scientists are trying to find a solution to problem A but chance upon a solution to problem B. This is exactly what happened in the case of mankind's dearly loved drug Viagra, that treats erectile dysfunction. In 1989, chemists at Pfizer's research centre in Kent, England, were working to find a new drug to treat hypertension and angina pectoris (chest pain due to blocked arteries). A new compound that was named Sildenafil (UK92480) was created and subsequently tested on a group of men. Unfortunately, in the clinical trials, the compound failed to have a desired effect on hypertension and did not help in dilating the muscles in the heart.

<strong>Viagra</strong> The little blue pill that could - CNN -

Viagra The little blue pill that could - CNN -

Ten years ago this month, the Food and Drug Administration's approval of a little blue pill changed the sex lives of millions of men and women. Viagra, the first oral treatment for erectile dysfunction was developed accidentally by scientists at Pfizer Laboratories and was greenlighted for use by the FDA on March 27, 1998."Originally, we were testing sildenafil, the active drug in Viagra, as a cardiovascular drug and for its ability to lower blood pressure,'' Dr. Brian Klee, senior medical director at Pfizer, told French news agency, AFP. "But one thing that was found during those trials is that people didn't want to give the medication back because of the side effect of having erections that were harder, firmer and lasted longer.'' Since its approval, Viagra has been used by 35 million men around the world. It took the taboo out of impotence — former presidential candidate Bob Dole who suffered from erectile dysfunction after surgery for prostate cancer once appeared in a commercial for the drug — and made it easier to treat. The primary indication of sildenafil is treatment of erectile dysfunction (inability to sustain a satisfactory erection to complete intercourse). Its use is now one of the standard treatments for erectile dysfunction, including for men with diabetes mellitus. Rare but serious adverse effects found through postmarketing surveillance include prolonged erections, severe low blood pressure, myocardial infarction (heart attack), ventricular arrhythmias, stroke, increased intraocular pressure, and sudden hearing loss. Care should be exercised by people who are also taking protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection. Protease inhibitors inhibit the metabolism of sildenafil, effectively multiplying the plasma levels of sildenafil, increasing the incidence and severity of side effects. Those using protease inhibitors are recommended to limit their use of sildenafil to no more than one 25 mg dose every 48 hours. blocker (typically prescribed for hypertension or for urologic conditions, such as benign prostatic hypertrophy) at the same time may lead to low blood pressure, but this effect does not occur if they are taken at least 4 hours apart.

I Took Knockoff <strong>Viagra</strong> Until I Learned What's In It - Tonic
I Took Knockoff Viagra Until I Learned What's In It - Tonic

Sep 25, 2018. Originally a medication developed by Pfizer to treat angina pectoris chest. Pfizer called it Viagra and made tens of billions of dollars over the. Oct 20, 2014. Viagra was originally tested for heart problems – angina pectoris, a chest pain associated with coronary heart disease – on the basis of its.

Viagra originally developed for
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